Varely Sludge Pump

Discussion in 'Identification' started by steammad, Feb 4, 2014.

  1. steammad

    steammad New Member

    Hi everyone,

    Back in 2009, I was given a small V-belt drive Varley water pump. Ever since then I have had the pump hooked up to my Bamford EG1.

    When acquired, the pump was seized and had a lot of internal surface rust. After removing the flywheel, the body of the pump was stripped down. As this was done, it was noticed that the pump is not of a design that I recognise at all and I wonder if anyone has any information about the company, "Varley", or any information regarding the type of pump?
    The shaft on which the flywheel sits, is fed into the first section of the pump. At the end of the shaft is a driving gear. To the left and right of this central gear sits two other gears, all connected to the central driving gear. The two outside gears have short shafts that pass through the middle frame of the pump and into the rear section. At the ends of these shafts are a crankweb and crankpin. A large horseshoe shape block of iron or steel is then placed onto these crankpins so that it moves eccentrically around the centre point of the central driving shaft in the first section of the pump.
    The horseshoe block sits in a "U" shaped chamber. Water is fed into the top of the chamber above one half of the horseshoe block. The water then follows the shape of the "U", flowing from the top of the left hand side of the chamber, down, around and up the right hand side of the chamber and out of the top on the right hand side.
    Moving on to the rear section. This is what I guess is a Valve block. I only say this because I had to renew two springs, one of a large diameter and one of a smaller diameter. I'm not 100% sure I understand how this part of the pump works, so I hope that there is someone with a bit of information that might be useful at all.

    Some pictures will follow shortly to aid my description.

    Any information regarding the company, the type of pump etc. will be greatly appreciated.

    Many thanks,

    Dan.
     

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