Bradford Amanco

Discussion in 'Help Wanted' started by Glenreed, Sep 17, 2011.

  1. Glenreed

    Glenreed Member

    Hi Just picked up my new engine today and wondered if there are any resident experts who could help me with Basic starting instructions and possibly help with dating it, Its a Bradford Amanco enclosed crank with spoked flywheels engine no is 14375
    stamped in the end of the crank and on the top of the govener arm. Engine appears to be in reasonable condition and has a healthy spark and plenty of compression so i dont see any reason why it wont go once i have fabricated a starting handle, although im not to sure why there is what appears to be 2 adjustment knobs on the carb. Any help greatly appreciated

    Glen
     
  2. air-cooled

    air-cooled Member

    Hi Glen,

    Bradford Amanco engines were built between about 1931 and 1946. Although there is a dating list available for Bradford engines, the Bradford Amanco serial numbers do not feature on the list, making more exact dating rather difficult. I can supply a basic manual if you need one.

    Phillip
     
  3. Glenreed

    Glenreed Member

    Hi thanks for your reply,
    I have got a manual for the amanco range and for the king of engines range which all seem similar i was just a bit baffled by what seems to be 2 mixture screws? 1 seems to be on the fuel inlet which makes sense and the other is on the carburettor bowl. I have studied a few pictures of similar engines on the net and none seem to have this arrangement. I will try to upload some pictures if i can figure it out.
    Am i right in saying that i have to manually fill the carburettor bowl when cold starting?
    Also do you know if the starting handle should be like the amanco 1 which engages on the flywheel key ?

    Thanks again for taking the time to reply

    Glen
     
  4. air-cooled

    air-cooled Member

    It sounds like your engine is a petrol/paraffin version. The carb bowl being filled with petrol for starting and then turning over to the paraffin tank when hot. Therefore, one mixture screw for petrol and one for paraffin. A few pictures from different angles would clear this up.

    Starting handle on flywheel key, usually, like an Amanco.

    Phillip
     
  5. matth

    matth New Member

    I wouldnt bother with the handle, these Bradfords kick back like hell, I have a straight petrol one, that doesnt have a starting pot, to start I wind the jet out about 1/3 of a turn from closed, and 3 or 4 pulls of the flywheels over compression and it usually starts, then slowly wind the jet in till it runs smoothly
     
  6. Glenreed

    Glenreed Member

    Had a go at starting it this morning pulling it over on the flywheels with no luck it kicked a couple of times but i got a dodgy back at the moment so gave up before i totally crippled myself (just partly at the mo) note i can still type. i was initially unsure of which way to turn it. I have been turning it clockwise if your looking at it from the carb side i assume this is right?
    gonna try and add some pics
     
  7. Glenreed

    Glenreed Member

  8. matth

    matth New Member

    They arent Ideal if you have a bad back, they usually kick a couple of times, and then go, you really have to give them a good pull though, mine has an advance/retard lever which helps
     
  9. Glenreed

    Glenreed Member

  10. Glenreed

    Glenreed Member

    so am i right in thinking that this is a petrol/paraffin engine? if so does it run off neat paraffin when warm?
    My old David Brown Cropmaster was a petrol TVO and people gave me all kinds of different mixtures or paraffin, kerosene, diesel 2 stroke oil etc and it turned out it ran best off neat Kerosene (21 sec oil)
     
  11. miley_bob

    miley_bob Member

    Yes your engine is a pet/par model. Unless running on load I would either just use petrol or a mix of pet/par, certainly not pure TVO.

    Looking at your engine, are you sure is is a Bradford Amanco? The Amanco engines usually had a brass Amanco [plate on the water hopper and came with Amanco cast into the crankcase top cover.
     
  12. Glenreed

    Glenreed Member

    Bradford amanco was the conclusion i came up with after researching on the net, I have only just purchased it. It was advertised as a British built enclosed crank Amanco, the chap i bought it from was the son of the owner who unfortunately passed away and his knowledge of the engine was very limited. I know there were a lot of similar engines made by different people. No markings are present except for the engine number stamped into the end of the crankshaft and on the governor linkage although i must say i have not thoroughly check as I am at present suffering with a bad back and have been banned from tinkering by the wife. If yourself or anyone else has any input regards to make or model etc i am pleased to hear them, the mysteriousness makes it all the more interesting :lol:
     
  13. Glenreed

    Glenreed Member

    This is what i gather so far.....



    I need to get back to work iv almost figured out how to use this computer thing!
     
  14. miley_bob

    miley_bob Member

    The engine was built by the Bradford Gas Engine Works of Shipley (Yorkshire). Bradford engines were sold under several names as they were often contractors engines, hence why some are known as Bradford Amanco's. The Amanco ones usually have Amanco cast in the top and a brass Amanco plate.

    Looking at the pictures I would guess that your engine is not an Amanco one, but I could be wrong.

    No doubt Phillip (air-cooled) will have some more ideas on the origins of this engine.
     
  15. petternut

    petternut Administrator

    Sorry to be pedantic but its very easy to cause confusion: Paraffin/Kerosene are not the same thing as TVO.
    Paraffin/Kerosene/lamp oil/lighting paraffin/28 second heating oil is Zero octane.
    Tractor vapourising Oil (TVO) was a distinct distillate that ran from WW2 to the late 1950s with an octane rating of about 50. It is no longer made and there are various "recipes" touted. I suggest staying clear of any that use diesel (aka 35 second gas Oil).

    Shell for example will, or would, make up a TVO substitute if you buy a 45 gallon (100L) drum.
    Confusingly TVO is called Power Kero in Oz. See Wiki for a lengthy and detailed explanation.

    AFAIK the early Bradfords were similar to the US Associated (Amanco in the UK) but not an exact copy.

    regards
    Roland
     
  16. matth

    matth New Member

    I always thought that the Bradford-Amanco was the only one to have spoked flywheels
     
  17. Glenreed

    Glenreed Member

    That was my line of thinking...
     
  18. Glenreed

    Glenreed Member

    TVO never have 3 letters cause so much controversy :p

    fact is i think mostly what causes confusion is some engines were designed to run on TVO some on Kerosene etc.... and so on. Also some people are under the impression that kerosene is the same as paraffin.
     
  19. petternut

    petternut Administrator

    Kerosene is the same as paraffin.
     
  20. campingstoveman

    campingstoveman Active Member

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