Unknown Engine

Discussion in 'Identification' started by TonyR, Jul 5, 2009.

  1. TonyR

    TonyR New Member

    Hello

    I have had this Engine on this and every other site I know a couple of times in the past.
    I have found a bit of time and enthusiasm lately, the engine is now rebuilt. The generator still needs some work, but the engine does now run.
    I thought I would give you all another chance to delve into your memories and try and come up with an answer.
    I can't remember how to add pictures, but there are plenty to see at the following link.
    http://home-and-garden.webshots.com/alb ... and-garden
    Any info will be gratefully received.
    Thank you
    Tony
     
  2. Victoria

    Victoria Member

    Tony,
    Sticking my head over the parapet but I would say Aster. Wish I could read the words on the control on the aluminium plate low down on the body of the engine. Are the threads metric??

    Eric
     
  3. TonyR

    TonyR New Member

    Eric
    The words say start and run.
    The threads are Whitworth, BSF, UNF
    Thanks for the reply, I have been trying to identify this for 3 years.
    I will check our Aster.

    Tony
     
  4. Victoria

    Victoria Member

    Tony,
    I was hoping it would say "Marche and Arret"..! Nevertheless if it is an Aster, it could have been built in London but its a funny melange of threads? What age do you think it is?

    I base my guess on the fact I once worked with a chap who restored a similar engine, a London-built Aster, and that had the generator coil wound onto the extended crankshaft in the same way. He had a devil of a job with it but eventually got it going. However it was very much too early to have had UNF threads - let alone BSF which came out in the thirties I believe. I have an email address for him somewhere, will ask him for a description. Is the carb etc a bought-in one or a special, what is the magneto??

    Interesting!!

    regards
    Eric
     
  5. TonyR

    TonyR New Member

    Hi Eric

    There is no magneto it has points on the front of the engine.
    There is no Carb as such, the Aluminium handle adjusts the Air and the brass screw in the middle of it is a fuel jet.

    Tony
     
  6. air-cooled

    air-cooled Member

    I don't think this is an Aster. It is very much smaller (physically) than the smallest Aster gen set (even the one your friend has Eric). Also I don't think Aster's made 2-stroke engines either. Not much help I'm afraid....
    Phillip
     
  7. petternut

    petternut Administrator

    It might help if anyone knew when/where the port-in-piston first appeared.
    I have an early 20s Aster Catalogue. No two-strokes in that though it is stylistically very similar.

    ttfn

    Roland
     
  8. TonyR

    TonyR New Member

    Roland

    I spoke to the British 2 stroke club. If I remember correctly the guy there said the port in piston stopped in general use around the mid 1940's but said that it may have carried on in use for Stationary engines for longer, due to their lower revs than motor bikes.

    Tony
     
  9. DaveCarter

    DaveCarter New Member

    Very much like the piston and crankcase arrangement from a C.H.Johnson of Manchester, engine made under licence from Homelite corp., USA. Pre WW2 to fifties.
    http://home-and-garden.webshots.com/pho ... 8493uSwBnJ
    The bearing on the conrod on mine had no clamping facility and was just pressed in. It was held on the shaft by a large washer headed bolt screwing into the bearing stub. Very similar to yours. A spigot on the bolt's head drove the shaft which drove the rotary slide valve within the crankcase, and also operated the points on the other side of the crank case end plate.

    http://home-and-garden.webshots.com/pho ... 8493VpHchm

    I presume the shaft that operates the points on the outside of the end casing is driven from the big end retaining bolt as was mine.
    Unfortunately, I can not find any more photos of the engine in bits and I no longer own it.

    Regards,
    Dave Carter.
     
  10. TonyR

    TonyR New Member

    Dave

    The points are driven from a fork arrangement that fits over the big end bearing. I have added a picture of it to the webshots site.
    Don't know if it helps but all parts have part numbers starting with letters GO
    I still need to sort out the electrics but it may be easier if I knew the make of the engine.
     
  11. Victoria

    Victoria Member

    OK fair enough - but it certainly got the thread underway didn't it! Hope something positive happens re identification. Good luck
    Eric
     
  12. TonyR

    TonyR New Member

    Has this engine beaten everybody again.
    It's not an easy one.
    I have been trying to identify this for so long now, I may loose the will to live if I ever find the answer.

    Tony
     
  13. DaveCarter

    DaveCarter New Member

    Tony,
    Is there provision for mounting a coil behind the flywheel on the casing? Are there any magnets on the back of the flywheel?

    Regards,
    Dave Carter.
     
  14. petternut

    petternut Administrator

    The mixture of threads is very curious. IME some BSF and UNF threads are hard to distinguish from Metric. Also some European makers used Imperial threads with metric flats whilst early US makers used Imperial threads with fractional flats.
    Are you sure of the threads as previous and to which system(s) do the hex sizes conform?

    regards
    Roland
     
  15. TonyR

    TonyR New Member

    The generator fits directly to the back of the engine so no provision to mount coil, although the control panel is missing, it probably fit there similar to a Delco. There are no magnets, the ignition would be supplied from the batteries.
    As for the threads, most of the bolts are 5/16 whit, the Crank is held together with a 7/16 Whit 18 TPI and the big end bearing is held in place with a washer which is held to the crank pin with a UNF bolt ( can't remember size but I can check as I still have some left.

    Don't give up on it

    Tony
     
  16. petternut

    petternut Administrator

    Not giving up but I'm unsure whether I got my point across. I don't know whether you are identifying the thread system from the threads or the hex sizes or both. It could be important since there are many examples of threads from one system with hex from another.
    If both threads and hex sizes are consistent and Imperial then we can be 99% sure it was made in Britain or the (then) Colonies. It might also help to know if the BSW hex sizes conform to the 1929 or earlier standard.

    Only 99% because licence built engines sometimes retained their original threads.

    hth
    Roland
     
  17. TonyR

    TonyR New Member

    I will re measure the bolts and let you know the diamentions.

    Tony
     
  18. TonyR

    TonyR New Member

    I think I am wrong about the threads, I based my assumption on the crank nut being 7/16 18 tpi. I assumed it was BSF as this was the only standard thread I could find. It wasn't in the best condition as it had been tightened with a chisel. I didn't properly check the 5/16 bolts as the TPI is the same on whit and UNC. I was only interested in buying replacement nuts and bolts for the ones which were missing or damaged. The bolt heads are 1/2 inch across flats which i think is 5/16 unc.
    I think the crank nut must be a special UN 18 TPI, as it wasn't a standard size nut.
    Sorry to have misled everybody
    No excuses now, lets identify the engine.

    Tony
     
  19. ploughman

    ploughman New Member

    Threads.

    Hi,
    I think your threads are ANC/ANF, the forerunner of unified. I am not sure of the difference, but I think it is in the root and crest rad. I believe unc/f to be sharp crested.
    Regards
    Harry
     
  20. petternut

    petternut Administrator

    Chances are then that its from the USA...

    regards
    Roland
     

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